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Hope Pole Changing To BBQ Bar


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The Hope Pole in Commercial Road closes it's doors on September 8th and re opens as BBQ and Brew on September 25th with 24 additional staff

 

A carnivorous celebration of the American Deep South pit barbecue. Forget the sad burnt banger on the Barbie at home, this is barbecue as it’s meant to be.
 
In true Southern style, BBQs & Brews slow cook their meat in imported American smokers for up to 18 hours. Locally-bred Herefordshire meat takes centre stage here, coupled with authentic barbecue rubs and sauces inspired by the Texan masters. The open kitchen gives customers ringside seats to the smoking process before they tuck into some of our mouth-watering dishes on offer.
 
And the tribute to America continues at the bar, pitting punchy American Craft beers and smooth bourbons against delicious English cask ales and local craft cider.
 
This is a fun-loving, family-friendly barbecue joint, offering something for everyone. Whether you want to celebrate an event, catch up with a group of friends, enjoy a family treat or just to enjoy the game in the bar with friends, there’s always a good reason to visit BBQs & Brews. Even if it’s just for the love of meat.

 

BBQ And Brews Website

 

Email: lovemeat@bbqsandbrews.co.uk
 
Telephone:
01432 355675
 
Address: 
BBQs & BREWS
Commercial road
Hereford, HR1 2BP.
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Quote ..... The open kitchen gives customers ringside seats to the smoking process before they tuck into some of our mouth-watering dishes on offer.

 

Don't think Dippy will be taking a ringside seat ! ( Nor will I )

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It baffles me how Hereford, the home of the most globally renowned beef, has to open a generic steak house and an americanised BBQ place.

Couldn't agree more . ( I accept fully that it appears that they are going to employ more staff - should think mostly part time - that would be good news if / when it happens )

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So long as it is local produce used i would support it the day of the local pub as we all know is changing i am a traditionalist some of us older ones do not like change i cannot support a pub in the way that most people do as i do not drink but i do love the atmosphere a pub can generate i enjoyed the night out at Jim Kenyon's pub the Victory where a lot of us who use Belmont voice got together by the way did Jim say he was putting on a barbecue when the weather got better and Colin if you read this bring the hat around and we can donate some money to keep the voice going.

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It baffles me how Hereford, the home of the most globally renowned beef, has to open a generic steak house and an americanised BBQ place.

Biomech have you ever seen the film The rare breed? All about the first Hereford bull that was taken to the good old USA starring James Stewart & Maureen O'hara brilliant film brings a tear to my eye everytime!!

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It is dippy & no he that's vindicator does not end up as a burger or two but I'm not going to say anymore as you should really watch it, as you've not seen it before? cos I'm sure you will enjoy it?! & don't blame me if it does brings a tear to your eye also?!

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Biomech have you ever seen the film The rare breed? All about the first Hereford bull that was taken to the good old USA starring James Stewart & Maureen O'hara brilliant film brings a tear to my eye everytime!! 

 

 

 

I haven't no, I will keep it in mind though :)

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Dippy i thought I'd post up the plot from The rare breed for you Biomech & others to read hopefully you will watch the film to?

 

Martha Price (Maureen O'Hara) and her daughter Hilary (Juliet Mills) come to the US via boat with Hereford stock from Much Marcle pursuing the dream of Martha's husband, who accidentally died on board, to bring Hereford's to the West. They're now left with Hilary's bull, a result of years of European breeding, named Vindicator. Vindicator exhibits all the gentility of breeding, including an odd willingness to follow Hilary merely at the whistle of "God Save the Queen".

 

At auction, he results in a bidding war and is ultimately won by Charles Ellsworth (David Brian), who has come to purchase stock for the wealthy Texas rancher Alexander Bowen (Brian Keith). Sam Burnett (James Stewart), a local wrangler known for being able to take down bulls just by looking at them, is hired to transport the bull to Bowen's ranch. Ellsworth has bought the bull primarily to woo Martha, and when she is confronted by him when trying to claim her payment for the bull she decides to ensure Vindicator's delivery by accompanying him en route.

 

Martha Price is told by daughter Hilary about a conversation she overheard between Burnett and two men working for competing rancher John Taylor (Alan Caillou). Burnett has made a deal with Taylor to steal the bull. Hilary doesn't yet know that Burnett has made the deal mostly to ensure another wrangler doublecrossed by Taylor would receive some money to take care of himself after an injury. One of Taylor's men, Deke Simons (Jack Elam), gets into a fight with Burnett in the saloon over terms. Price, witnessing the brawl, comes to trust Burnett. Despite Burnett's objections, he accepts responsibility for the Price women through the train ride to the west and the following wagon trail.

 

One night while Price and Burnett are brewing coffee over the campfire, a shot knocks over the coffee pot. Burnett knows this is a signal from Taylor's men. Just before dawn, Hilary catches Burnett as he is about to hand over the bull. He denies her accusations, waking her mother to prove he was innocent. Once again, Price gives Burnett the benefit of the doubt.

 

Taylor's men find a fence which has been hacked through to make way for Price's wagon. They conclude that Burnett must have double-crossed them. Simons, determined to catch up with Burnett, shoots a companion and rides on after the wagon.

 

In a canyon, Burnett runs into Jamie Bowen (Don Galloway), Alexander's son, who has stolen a herd of his father's longhorn cattle and is running away to start his own ranch. Simons catches up and shoots a cowhand, setting off a stampede. Jamie tries to escape but falls in the path of the charging cattle.

 

Battered and unconscious, Jamie is carried by Burnett back to the wagon. Simons is there holding Price and her daughter hostage. Simons demands the money that Burnett was paid by Taylor for the bull. Simons also demands Price's money, but while distracted, Burnett is able to take his rifle. Simons mounts and gallops away. Burnett follows. As horses collide, Simons falls onto a sharp rock and is killed instantly.

 

Burnett returns with the money, but Price berates him for his dishonesty and the trouble he has caused. After a few days of travelling with Bowen's son in tow, they reach their destination, his father's ranch.

 

At the ranch they're introduced to Jamie's father, Bowen, a Scottish soldier turned cattle rancher at a fort also populated by local families of Mexican heritage. While Hilary nurses Jamie back to health, Martha begins teaching the local children in school. Though Bowen and Burnett insist the Price women should leave for the East again before they're snowed in, they refuse until Jamie is well and they've taught the men to properly care for Vindicator.

 

Bowen continues to insist that Hereford cattle can't make it through the tough conditions on the range and thus make them a bad match. Martha and Hilary insist, and slowly, Burnett is coming over to their side. Martha, upon witnessing the wildness of the longhorn cattle, realizes that until Vindicator proves himself, they'll never have the men on their side. Hilary races back to the fort, and releases Vindicator into the wild.

 

With Vindicator now in the wild to fend for himself and Jamie on the mend, the Price women announce its time for them to go, but Jamie insists he's in love with Hilary, who returns the proclamation and Martha, upon seeing them, realizes she needs to stay as well. This suits both Bowen, who's realized he's in love with Martha, and Burnett, who's known he loved Martha since they met.

 

Its a particularly brutal winter and Burnett insists on finding Vindicator and bringing him back to shelter him all winter. Through repeated outings, he can't find the bull and while he's away, Bowen cleans himself up, begins serving tea and showing Martha his gentlemanly side in an attempt to woo her.

 

Burnett is reported missing and the men finally find him, almost frozen. Bowen insists that he can have any calves that result from Vindicator, but surely the bull is dead. Burnett refuses to give up hope, even though Hilary and Martha have come to accept this as truth.

 

When the spring finally breaks, Burnett begins searching for Vindicator again, hoping for calves and begins building a new kind of farm—where the animals are treated better and Herefords can not only subsist but thrive. He finally discovers Vindicator, long dead under a snowdrift. He still insists that calves may be coming.

 

Martha, out of reluctance for anything else, agrees to marry Bowen, but only after there is no chance of calves from Vindicator. In one of the last scenes, Burnett finally finds a Hereford calf, brings him back to the fort, and proclaims his love for Martha. Bowen steps aside.

 

At the end, we're shown an entire field of Herefords, with Martha and Burnett musing that they're glad they kept a "few LongHorn, to remember the way it used to be". Hilary and Jamie approach, now married, and Hilary whistles in the hopes that one of the cattle will respond, and claims, "sometimes, I see a glimmer of him in one of them".

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So did Miller and Carter, before declaring that they couldn't and would be sourcing it from around the country

Really??

 

Crikey, I find that astonishing!

 

That surely is the equivalent of saying you can't source sand in the Sahara Desert........when you are based in the Sahara Desert!

 

It just seems a ridiculous statement - I wonder just how hard they have tried? Or perhaps it comes down to cost. They say they will source locally, after all, it sounds good - but only if it's cheap!

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What is local? If I recall correctly when S & A Davies were a potato rather than soft fruit enterprise when they need to fill their orders the spuds came from eastern Europe but as they were packed in Marden they were deemed to be local.

If you insist on local produce don't buy apples from South Africa, bacon from Denmark and wine from France!

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Well that's a little bit different. What we have here is like the region of Champagne in France only serving it's customers Champagne imported from another country/region that simply uses the ... species, let's say ... of Champagne grape, despite being the founding area for Champagne :P

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