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I don't know, Megilleland, but you would think it must be an important factor. This is where Heineken-Bulmer have traditionally sourced all their water that goes into the cider etc. There are lots of licensed boreholes in this area.

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That's what fields are for and not for concreting over.

It is west AND north of the school - it is a MASSIVE area!

I believe that at least half of these houses are reliant on the western bypass which is of course reliant on the southern link road, hence why the current council is pushing hard for the SLR.

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For Neighbourhood Plans and the like, Herefordshire Council provide detailed Environmental Assessment maps so that locals won't propose unsuitable plans that will harm the environment!

 

Strangely, the flooding from Yazor Brook and surface water flooding over fields nearby, and underlying minerals deposits are SO much more important in that context than they are for proposals of 1000+ homes!

Edited by Cloudberry
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HC are so desparate to get some houses built and not necessarily because people want to live in them - the pound coins are glistening bright in front of their very eyes.

 

I do worry that HC's housebuilding guidelines are going to be quietly put to one side.

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HC have not got a five year house building plan, that came to light last year with another housing development, and they were fined. Also at the Core Strategy inquiry earlier this year it was found they still did not have one infact the Inspector said the evidence put before her by the council was "out of date" and ordered an immediate update of the papers. I was there when she gave the council 3 days in which to bring the information up to date and present it to her!

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First published 31st May 2015 in Hereford Times News by Paul Broome

 
THE London-based firm drawing up plans for at least 1,000 homes on the edge of Hereford has been accused of shutting residents out.
 
Sarah Watkins was among 250 people who attended a three-day community planning weekend held by John Thompson & Partners to outline ideas for the huge development in Three Elms.
 
Should it be approved, a large patch of employment land and a new primary school would also be built on the near-100 hectare plot owned by the Church Commissioners for England.
 
A planning application won't be submitted until the autumn, but Mrs Watkins, who lives in Kings Acre, feels the bid is already a done deal.
 
"It seemed more like a tick-box exercise," she said.
 
"I don't feel as though there has been a genuine opportunity to feedback. It felt we were being steered in one direction; like they have already come up with their plans and this is just tokenistic. It feels as though they are shutting us out."
 
Mrs Watkins, 42, said she would be willing to engage in "genuine consultation", adding she appreciates the need for further city homes.
 
A group of residents have since formed the Three Elms Community Group to voice their concerns. Many say they have not been consulted properly.
 
"I do understand that housing is needed," added Mrs Watkins who says her main concern is the increase in traffic.
 
"I know of people in need of affordable housing, but I think Kings Acre is such a special area. People say they jog here, walk their dog here. I want that distinctive area to stay."
 
She said she hopes the homes will be eco-friendly and feature plenty of space between them.
 
JTP produced an illustrative masterplan following the community event which included plans for Huntington Lane to be pedestrianised.
 
The Church Commissioners said the feedback they received from the planning weekend will "influence how this development is delivered".
 
"Residents were invited to participate in two days of workshops to discuss issues and opportunities in relation to this proposal, as well as to assist in the drawing up of an illustrative masterplan for the site," said the Commissioners in a statement.
 
"We continue to welcome community feedback as the proposals develops and will be holding an exhibition presenting the proposals prior to the submission of an outline planning application in autumn 2015."

 

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First published 31st May 2015 in Hereford Times News by Paul Broome

 
THE London-based firm drawing up plans for at least 1,000 homes on the edge of Hereford has been accused of shutting residents out.
 
Sarah Watkins was among 250 people who attended a three-day community planning weekend held by John Thompson & Partners to outline ideas for the huge development in Three Elms.
 
Should it be approved, a large patch of employment land and a new primary school would also be built on the near-100 hectare plot owned by the Church Commissioners for England.
 
A planning application won't be submitted until the autumn, but Mrs Watkins, who lives in Kings Acre, feels the bid is already a done deal.
 
"It seemed more like a tick-box exercise," she said.
 
"I don't feel as though there has been a genuine opportunity to feedback. It felt we were being steered in one direction; like they have already come up with their plans and this is just tokenistic. It feels as though they are shutting us out."
 
Mrs Watkins, 42, said she would be willing to engage in "genuine consultation", adding she appreciates the need for further city homes.
 
A group of residents have since formed the Three Elms Community Group to voice their concerns. Many say they have not been consulted properly.
 
"I do understand that housing is needed," added Mrs Watkins who says her main concern is the increase in traffic.
 
"I know of people in need of affordable housing, but I think Kings Acre is such a special area. People say they jog here, walk their dog here. I want that distinctive area to stay."
 
She said she hopes the homes will be eco-friendly and feature plenty of space between them.
 
JTP produced an illustrative masterplan following the community event which included plans for Huntington Lane to be pedestrianised.
 
The Church Commissioners said the feedback they received from the planning weekend will "influence how this development is delivered".
 
"Residents were invited to participate in two days of workshops to discuss issues and opportunities in relation to this proposal, as well as to assist in the drawing up of an illustrative masterplan for the site," said the Commissioners in a statement.
 
"We continue to welcome community feedback as the proposals develops and will be holding an exhibition presenting the proposals prior to the submission of an outline planning application in autumn 2015."

 

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I would just like to inform everybody that the newly formed Three Elms Community Group will be holding a meeting on the 7th June at the HMTC hall on Whitecross Road at 6pm.Feel free to attend to discuss this development.

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By the time a PA gets to the public consultation so much has already gone on and yes I suspect that this was just a box ticking exercise like they all.  The people that are put in to answer the questions raised by the public do not know the area so when alternatives are suggested they just give that disinterested nod and so it goes on.

 

Developers rule.

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Thank you to whoever it was, (can’t remember which thread), for posting details of the Three Elms Community group meeting last night (as otherwise I would not have known.)

 

Many thanks to Jim Kenyon for chairing, - great to have expertise from him and the other Councillors on how to do community groups.

 

Most people saw many more cars (from 1000+ new houses) as the biggest threat that would make the existing peak-time congestion into Hereford on Roman Road and Whitecross Road very much worse.  Do people from Credenhill etc. realise how they would be affected too?  We also heard many other things about the land round Huntington Lane, - it being A1 agricultural land, full of wildlife, prone to flood, especially if water now being taken out by Heineken Bulmers and Cargill was ever stopped.

 

Regular meetings being planned now, Facebook page etc.!

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However, Housing and Planning Minister Brandon Lewis insists that protection for the countryside is being maintained.


"I think we've got a system now that trusts local people to make those decisions, and the National Planning Policy Framework is actually very clear.


"Great weight should be given to conserving landscapes and Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty.


"Planning permission should be refused for major developments in these except in exceptional circumstances and where it can be demonstrated that it is in the public interest."


File on 4 is on BBC Radio 4 on Tuesday 9 June at 20:00 BST. Listen online or download the programme podcast.


 


 


Do these people live in cloud cuckoo land?


Edited by Denise Lloyd
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  • 2 weeks later...

The next meeting for the Three Elms Community Group will take place on the 28th June at 6pm at the Hereford Musical Theatre Company on Whitecross Road. Please come along to discuss your concerns about the proposed development of at least 1000 homes.

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  • 1 month later...

There is a meeting on Wednesday 19th August at the HMTC hall on Whitecross Road at 7pm. This meeting has been arranged by the Three Elms Community Group with the Church Commissioners and JTP. This is a chance for residents who are concerned about the proposed development of at least 1200 new homes on the land at Huntington to ask many unanswered questions.

Feel free to attend.

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Forgive me troops but in the past I have lived in many a county where normally the procedure is to extract the mineral benefits, then fill the hole with rubbish cover with soil and then build houses on it. Of course the other option is to build houses and then watch them flood unless of course there is a plan to fill the otherside of said new bypass with lots of balancing ponds(very popular these days). The western bypass carries a lot of argument but packaging these houses here well I don't think it's a clever plan at all!

It's all about hydrology,minerals and aquifers and there's a reason for why the three work well together...apparently!

Edited by greenknight
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Flood risk map from the Environment Agency. And we all know that the greater the area of tarmac and roofs, the smaller the area for water to infiltrate into the soil, and the more the land will flood.

 

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The Environment Agency also have a map of water extraction and boreholes. I think I am right in saying that a lot of the water needed by Heineken/Bulmers comes from here. Drinks are mainly water, right?! What happens if abstracting water for cider etc.stops? Where would the water go instead?

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I understand that the water level in the boreholes for Heineken/HP Bulmer is less than 2m below the ground level in the summer so actually very close to the surface. What happens to all the run off from the roads, including the Western Relief road in this area, which includes oil and other nasty pollutants from vehicles - will this get into the water in the boreholes used in the drinks production? I have family whose jobs are dependent on this major employer and  we dont want to lose Heineken due to pollution that could be avoided. Otherwise what jobs will there be for the people moving into these 1,000+ new homes? Or is this yet another area for retirees to move to when they sell up their homes in the South East for a fortune? It will hardly make Hereford the place for young families to move to if there are no good jobs.

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I understand that the water level in the boreholes for Heineken/HP Bulmer is less than 2m below the ground level in the summer so actually very close to the surface. What happens to all the run off from the roads, including the Western Relief road in this area, which includes oil and other nasty pollutants from vehicles - will this get into the water in the boreholes used in the drinks production? I have family whose jobs are dependent on this major employer and  we dont want to lose Heineken due to pollution that could be avoided. Otherwise what jobs will there be for the people moving into these 1,000+ new homes? Or is this yet another area for retirees to move to when they sell up their homes in the South East for a fortune? It will hardly make Hereford the place for young families to move to if there are no good jobs.

Often local homeowners fight losing battles over planning applications however it might just be that the need for clean water from a major employer in the County will carry quite a lot of weight Maggie if suddenly it's source is restricted and quality reduced because ultimately this will cost to put right.

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Often local homeowners fight losing battles over planning applications however it might just be that the need for clean water from a major employer in the County will carry quite a lot of weight Maggie if suddenly it's source is restricted and quality reduced because ultimately this will cost to put right.

 Who will let Heineken know about these proposed plans as their head office is not in Hereford? I cant see Herefordshire Council or the developers letting them know the risk to their production processes as both just want 1,000s of new homes to make lots of money and wont want this jeopardised by any big employer.

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Just driven along Three Elms Rd. and noticed that there is a very big digger in the field between the school and Hunterton Lane .This digger has dug a number of trenches at various locations within the field , at a rough estimate 20m long by 1.5 m wide . Appears to be at least 7 trenches . Number of men wearing hard hats and hi.vis jackets wandering around the trenches .

 

I know nothing about digging trenches with a digger , my experience stops at shovels ! I just guess that it's all connected with the flood plain .

Edited by Ubique
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Ubique I think they are probably checking drainage and composition of the soil. I think they dig a length and see how long it takes for water to drain away. I've been trying to think of word and it is porousity.  They have done much the same on the fields involved in the SLR. 

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