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Hereford Cathedral Field Of Remembrance


Bill Thomas
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Hereford Cathedral 'Field Of Remembrance'

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On Thursday 5 November, a Field of Remembrance opened in the Lady Arbour here at Hereford Cathedral as a county-wide focus for remembrance.

 

At least 4,052 personnel of the Royal Navy, Army, Royal Air Force and Merchant Navy from Herefordshire have died in service since 1914 and their names are recorded in two Rolls of Honour.

 

The Field of Remembrance will allow the public to pay their respects to our fallen soldiers and the cathedral have worked in conjunction with the Herefordshire branch of the Royal British Legion (RBL) to put this special tribute in place.

 

Poppies will be planted within the field and each remembrance tribute carries a personal message to someone who lost their life in the service of the country.

 

There are also books of condolence available to view in the on-site gazebo provided by the RBL, and members of the public will be able to search for, and ensure, their relatives' names are recorded in these books.

 

Visitors are able to purchase poppies and poppy crosses from the Cathedral shop - apart from on Sunday when they are available from the stewards on duty - and there is an area for people to plant a cross if they wish.

 

The field was dedicated at a short service at 11am on 5 November and is now open to the public every day from 10am until 3pm.

 

The Field of Remembrance will close on November 15 and the personal crosses planted by members of the public will then be recovered by members of the RBL, burnt, and the ashes scattered in First World War battlefields in northern France and Belgium.

 

Speaking about the opening of the Field of Remembrance, The Dean of Hereford, Michael Tavinor, said:

 

'Hereford Cathedral is proud to join with the Royal British Legion in creating this tribute in the Lady Arbour.

 

'We hope the Field of Remembrance will be a place of tranquillity and reflection in which to remember those who have fallen in the service of their country.' 

 

 

 

Hereford Cathedral Website

 

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Wednesday at 11am. Up to 100 veterans and young people will be at the annual commemoration of Rememberance at the St.Martins Street cenatraph. Join us. 1914 - 1918, 57 men from south Wye gave their lives for this country. There was no Hinton, Hunderton, Pudston, Red Hill or Newton Farm estates. Lower Bullingham and Belmont were fields. What did this mean to the families of the area, most of their men must have died.

Then, Rotherwas munitions factory, and the toll that took on not just local folk but, mainly women, from Wales and across the Midlands.

When the 2nd War ended, Col. Stirling made his camp here for his Special Air Service Regiment. Some of those men lie in a small part of the St.Martins Church grave yard. There are famolies in south Wye to whom the nation owes a great deal of gratitude.

 

For several years now, the south Wye veterans have quietly, and with great dignity, paid their respects at the St.Martins Street cenatraph. They have welcomed the students from local schools, some who are children of serving soldiers. The two age groups have a bonding that crosses the age difference but binds them together by their geographic closeness.

 

Never again must we allow politicians and generals to send men and women to slaughter.

If you can, join us. It will mean a great deal to the veterans and our young people.

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Wednesday at 11am. Up to 100 veterans and young people will be at the annual commemoration of Rememberance at the St.Martins Street cenatraph. Join us. 1914 - 1918, 57 men from south Wye gave their lives for this country. There was no Hinton, Hunderton, Pudston, Red Hill or Newton Farm estates. Lower Bullingham and Belmont were fields. What did this mean to the families of the area, most of their men must have died.

Then, Rotherwas munitions factory, and the toll that took on not just local folk but, mainly women, from Wales and across the Midlands.

When the 2nd War ended, Col. Stirling made his camp here for his Special Air Service Regiment. Some of those men lie in a small part of the St.Martins Church grave yard. There are famolies in south Wye to whom the nation owes a great deal of gratitude.

 

For several years now, the south Wye veterans have quietly, and with great dignity, paid their respects at the St.Martins Street cenatraph. They have welcomed the students from local schools, some who are children of serving soldiers. The two age groups have a bonding that crosses the age difference but binds them together by their geographic closeness.

 

Never again must we allow politicians and generals to send men and women to slaughter.

If you can, join us. It will mean a great deal to the veterans and our young people.

Enjoyed reading that bit of war time history of South wye interesting stuff chris thank you.

 

Herefordshire does have a rich history of contribution during both wars…as there was a very large munitions factory's at Morton on lugg during WWI which people maybe unaware of? Also at the end of WWII Rudolf Hess was flown out to the Nuremberg trials from the RAF airfield at Madley!

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