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The latest litter problem - vaping packaging


megilleland
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On my litter picks notice there is a new product on the streets. These contain nicotine and should not be sold to under 18s. They come in various flavours which appeal to the younger generation. The worst aspect of the packaging is the small rubber stopper to the container, which like the plastic drink bottle tops wash down the drain, although most drains are blocked and kerbs are overgrown. The manufacturers, Chinese and the marketeers, Romanian don't care and the local shop keepers display the products at the point of sale encouraging their use. The packaging warns users with a skull and crossbones graphic as part of its design.

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Vaping packages and rubber stoppers

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Plastic drinks bottle tops

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This tells you how bad things are getting. In The Guardian today.

Tiny turtle pooed ‘pure plastic’ for six days after rescue from Sydney beach

A baby green sea turtle rescued from a Sydney beach had eaten so much plastic that it took six days for the contents to be excreted, according to Taronga zoo’s wildlife hospital.

The 127-gram hatchling was found lying on its back in a rockpool near Sydney’s Tamarama beach. It was missing one of its four flippers, had a chip in another, and had a hole in its shell.

Carers said that aside from these injuries, the turtle appeared to be in good physical condition and had no trouble swimming.

“But then it started to defecate, and it defecated plastic for six days. No faeces came out, just pure plastic,” the Taronga veterinary nurse Sarah Male said.

“It was all different sizes, colours and compositions. Some were hard, some were sharp, and with some, you could tell the plastic had writing on it. This is all some of these poor little things are eating. There’s so much plastic around they’re just consuming it as their first initial food,” she said.

States including New South Wales, Queensland and Western Australia, have all brought in tougher bans on single-use plastic, but the scale of the problem is at times overwhelming.

More than 8m tonnes pour into oceans around the world each year. The majority is carried out to sea by rivers, dumped along coastlines or abandoned by fishing vessels.

A study of a beach on Henderson Island, one of the world’s most remote places, found nearly 38m pieces of plastic strewn across the sand.

However, CSIRO researchers reported in June that local actions were making a difference with the amount of plastic pollution on Australia’s coast decreasing by up to 30% on average as a result of work by local governments to reduce litter.

“If everybody just takes a little bit of their time to pick up a bit of rubbish – it doesn’t have to be on the beach – then hopefully we can make a difference,” Male said.

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  • 2 weeks later...

‘When I see kids vaping, I warn them: that’s what killed my daughter’

“She would go into the local shop and buy these vaping liquids but you would never see the same bottle twice,” said Rachel Howe, 45, her mother. “There would be coconut, cherry, bubblegum vapes. It was constantly in her mouth.”

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