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Frank Smith

Cyclists on Footpaths!

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I spotted these cyclists earlier on the footpath along Edgar St

 

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Edited by Alex

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In The Guardian today:

UK may consider electric vehicle subsidy to increase cycling

Roads minister Jesse Norman says government could push councils to do more to fight pollution and inactive living
 

(extract)

The UK government could potentially consider providing subsidies for electric bicycles and electric cars as part of a concerted policy effort to get more people cycling, the roads minister, Jesse Norman, has said.

With the UK facing health crises from pollution and inactive living, other plans could include using electric cargo bikes to deliver packages from internet retailers rather than vans, Norman told the Guardian.

Saying his ambition was to “make the transition to a world where a 12-year-old can cycle safelyâ€, Norman said he could not promise extra funding for cycle routes, but said central government could start pushing councils to take more action.

A review into cycling safety announced last month would be broad, possibly including whether cyclists should be forced to wear helmets and high-visibility clothing, Norman said. But he promised any conclusions would be led by evidence.

I don't wear high viz often or a helmet. If it becomes another legal requirement the council will only treat it as another cash cow.

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If a 12 year old could cycle safely around Hereford many of you may find there would be alot less cyclists using the pavements as they would feel safe to cycle on the roads. I am not excusing their behaviour, but sometimes it takes a lot of nerve to cycle down the Belmont road or over Greyfriars bridge, when there is a pavement which the majority of the time has no pedestrians on.

As I have said previously, Herefordshire Council are designing all new cycle routes so that pedestrians and cyclists are expected to share the same space. Many bits around Hereford are unconnected so that people like me are expected to cycle partway on the pavement, then into the road (quite a dangerous manoeuvre by the Newtown Rd/Grandstand Rd roundabout) and then back on the pavement. The worst cycle route is on the way to Credenhill which if you cycle out of the city requires you to criss/cross from cycle path across the road onto the main road.I usually just trundle along the road and avoid the cycle path as it is too dangerous to get on and off! 

The new City Link road when it opens apparently has no segregated and protected cycle paths, instead cyclists and pedestrians will be expected to share the pavement as the cars and lorries need the other lanes. Expect more cyclists on the pavements if this is what is being proposed by the Council on a brand new £27million road.

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On 20/10/2017 at 21:19, Maggie May said:

If a 12 year old could cycle safely around Hereford many of you may find there would be alot less cyclists using the pavements as they would feel safe to cycle on the roads. I am not excusing their behaviour, but sometimes it takes a lot of nerve to cycle down the Belmont road or over Greyfriars bridge, when there is a pavement which the majority of the time has no pedestrians on.

As I have said previously, Herefordshire Council are designing all new cycle routes so that pedestrians and cyclists are expected to share the same space. Many bits around Hereford are unconnected so that people like me are expected to cycle partway on the pavement, then into the road (quite a dangerous manoeuvre by the Newtown Rd/Grandstand Rd roundabout) and then back on the pavement. The worst cycle route is on the way to Credenhill which if you cycle out of the city requires you to criss/cross from cycle path across the road onto the main road.I usually just trundle along the road and avoid the cycle path as it is too dangerous to get on and off! 

The new City Link road when it opens apparently has no segregated and protected cycle paths, instead cyclists and pedestrians will be expected to share the pavement as the cars and lorries need the other lanes. Expect more cyclists on the pavements if this is what is being proposed by the Council on a brand new £27million road.

 

While I understand concerns, it was never really an issue for us growing up, I can understand cyclists feeling safer riding on footpaths but try asking the same question to the pedestrians about cyclists on footpaths! It is against the law to ride cycle on many footpaths simple! I would feel a lot safer driving my car along the hard shoulder of the motorway rather than have to be in the same lane as a huge lorry or bus in my little car but I can't can I.

 

I think ALL cyclists should have a test similar to that of motorcycles and give people some education.

 

The council offer free courses which Ubique posted above. 

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While I understand concerns, it was never really an issue for us growing up, I can understand cyclists feeling safer riding on footpaths but try asking the same question to the pedestrians about cyclists on footpaths! It is against the law to ride cycle on many footpaths simple! I would feel a lot safer driving my car along the hard shoulder of the motorway rather than have to be in the same lane as a huge lorry or bus in my little car but I can't can I.

 

I think ALL cyclists should have a test similar to that of motorcycles and give people some education.

 

The council offer free courses which Ubique posted above. 

attachicon.gifpost-862-0-62664600-1508442035_thumb.jpeg

 

Absolutely spot on Steve.

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Stretches of the pavement in Whitecross Road are shared cycle & footpaths, Ubique. Which bits are you on about?

This was the town bound pavement between the Church and the Alms House , going on from that , yesterday on the same stretch I saw what I think is called a pedi- cycle ( a pedal cycle with a large box attached to rear ) riding towards town on the pavement . Because the traffic was stationary I was able to observe his progress , at one point where the pavement narrows a pedestrian stepped into the kerb to allow the pedi cycle to pass.

As I have said previously , I can fully understand the reasons cyclists ride on the pavement but they must show due care or take the consequences .

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Yesterdays criminals...

 

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This lad knocked into two elderly people just after we took this photo. The couple were pretty upset because the cyclists had caught the mans arm as he continued to ride past them on the narrow footpath, he didn't even stop to apologise.

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I was chatting with a friend this morning and he was telling me that his daughter had a to fork out for £300 worth or damaged to her car this week, caused by a cyclists. 

 

Apparently the cyclist just rode into the side of her car as she was just about to get into the car after her lunch break, he actually fell off his bike, said sorry and rode off. Lots of damage to both the back door and rear panel. These cyclists should be insured it is unfair that people liken my friends daughter have to pay hundreds of pounds fro damaged caused by a cyclist.

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Although there are "No Cycling" signs at both ends of the footpath from Grandstand Road (by the betting shop) to Holmer Road (Texaco Filling Station), this notice has been attached to railings alongside the path facing towards the industrial estate (Howdens).

 

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Although there are "No Cycling" signs at both ends of the footpath from Grandstand Road (by the betting shop) to Holmer Road (Texaco Filling Station), this notice has been attached to railings alongside the path facing towards the industrial estate (Howdens).

 

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There should be more of these signs.

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Hi All,

Interested to read more on this topic and see the photos.

I wish I had been quicker with my phone today - Lovely chap cycled up to the Victoria Bridge and got off - started to push his bike over towards me when I heard " Look Out" from behind me - spun round and saw another dog walker scope her little dog up out of the way of a woman pedaling really really slowly. I stepped to the side and said " Its No Cycling on this bridge "  The other lady wasn't so polite. The cyclist was now going so slow around us all she was wobbling all over the place until she came along side the gentleman cyclist and literally ran out of speed and fell into him.

He was furious but she didn't say a word or look remotely embarrassed that she had effectively cut up 3 people and 2 dogs. She simply got back on her bike and peddled away and yes I saw what house she went into !!!!

Maybe I should pop a sign through the door when I am next passing but I really think that the signs are a good idea even if it raises awareness. I know the roads are dangerous but walkers should feel safe on the pavements surely?

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Hi All,

Interested to read more on this topic and see the photos.

I wish I had been quicker with my phone today - Lovely chap cycled up to the Victoria Bridge and got off - started to push his bike over towards me when I heard " Look Out" from behind me - spun round and saw another dog walker scope her little dog up out of the way of a woman pedaling really really slowly. I stepped to the side and said " Its No Cycling on this bridge "  The other lady wasn't so polite. The cyclist was now going so slow around us all she was wobbling all over the place until she came along side the gentleman cyclist and literally ran out of speed and fell into him.

He was furious but she didn't say a word or look remotely embarrassed that she had effectively cut up 3 people and 2 dogs. She simply got back on her bike and peddled away and yes I saw what house she went into !!!!

Maybe I should pop a sign through the door when I am next passing but I really think that the signs are a good idea even if it raises awareness. I know the roads are dangerous but walkers should feel safe on the pavements surely?

 

Hi TaraLeigh and welcome to Hereford Voice.

 

Unfortunately this is becoming more frequent and more should be done by the police and councils to prevent this once and for all. 

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Only yesterday morning I witnessed a man riding his cycle down Whitecross Rd towards town , he was on the Alms Houses side of the road , on the pavement ,near to the Hospice Charity Shop / warehouse .

 

Nothing unusual you are thinking ......... My attention was drawn to him because there was a small child aged about 3 / 4 years of age sitting on the handlebars with its legs dangling over the front wheel , going on from that the cyclists was wearing a cycle helmet , the child wasn't .

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I was chatting with a friend this morning and he was telling me that his daughter had a to fork out for £300 worth or damaged to her car this week, caused by a cyclists. 

 

Apparently the cyclist just rode into the side of her car as she was just about to get into the car after her lunch break, he actually fell off his bike, said sorry and rode off. Lots of damage to both the back door and rear panel. These cyclists should be insured it is unfair that people liken my friends daughter have to pay hundreds of pounds fro damaged caused by a cyclist.

 

This is not fair and the laws need to one changed.

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Whilst I agree with the vast majority of the comments on this thread, I must add some balance from a cyclist viewpoint.

On Tuesday morning, my wife was cycling to work along Blackfriars Street towards Widemarsh Street.

A man in a BMW passed her so closely that his wing mirror hit her handlebar, he then proceeded to berate my wife for hitting his car...

I am in no way condoning bad behaviour by people on bicycles, but car drivers are not wholly innocent in the overall picture, if it was actually properly safe to cycle on the roads, I dare say there would be less bike use on pavements.

I do agree though that there should be more law enforcement.

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Whilst I agree with the vast majority of the comments on this thread, I must add some balance from a cyclist viewpoint.

On Tuesday morning, my wife was cycling to work along Blackfriars Street towards Widemarsh Street.

A man in a BMW passed her so closely that his wing mirror hit her handlebar, he then proceeded to berate my wife for hitting his car...

I am in no way condoning bad behaviour by people on bicycles, but car drivers are not wholly innocent in the overall picture, if it was actually properly safe to cycle on the roads, I dare say there would be less bike use on pavements.

I do agree though that there should be more law enforcement.

 

We are all aware of the bad habits of some motorists, this tope is purely about cyclists riding on footpaths, that said I understand exactly what you are saying about feeling safe on footpaths but I have to agree with Steve's comments above...

 

While I understand concerns, it was never really an issue for us growing up, I can understand cyclists feeling safer riding on footpaths but try asking the same question to the pedestrians about cyclists on footpaths! It is against the law to ride cycle on many footpaths simple! I would feel a lot safer driving my car along the hard shoulder of the motorway rather than have to be in the same lane as a huge lorry or bus in my little car but I can't can I.

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I understand that, Colin, but my wife was on the road, behaving herself and was hit, then abused by a motorist. If she was on the pavement, it wouldn't have happened, that is part of the reason for it, so it is linked to the topic in hand whether people like it or not.

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I understand that, Colin, but my wife was on the road, behaving herself and was hit, then abused by a motorist. If she was on the pavement, it wouldn't have happened, that is part of the reason for it, so it is linked to the topic in hand whether people like it or not.

 

I understand what you are saying but on the flip side many people are hurt from cyclist riding on footpaths, and while I can sympathise, two wrongs do not make it right. The law is their for a reason. 

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Maybe this is why some people cycle on the pavement.
 

Cambridgeshire Police have rejected a scheme designed to protect cyclists from close passes from vehicles as it could force motorists to move into the opposite lane to overtake and mean they needed to slow down when unable to overtake.

Operation Close Pass, which has seen a reduction of 20 per cent in the number of cyclists killed or seriously injured in the West Midlands where it was first rolled out, has been deemed not “practical†due to the “lack of road space†in Cambridge.

The scheme uses plain clothes officers on bikes equipped with video cameras to target offending drivers. When a vehicle passes too close another officer stops it and the driver given an education input pointing out the error of their ways. Only the most serious offenders are prosecuted.

22 police forces across the UK are currently carrying out the scheme, but Cambridgeshire Police will not be joining because it could force motorists to move into the opposite lane when overtaking, or to slow down when unable to overtake.

“Cyclists are advised to cycle 0.75 metres away from the kerb to avoid drain covers and an average car is about two metres wide. Operation Close Pass recommends drivers leave about 1.5 metres when passing a cyclist.

“If we add all those figures together it would mean drivers are moving into the opposite lane to overtake.

“For Cambridge city where roads are narrower and often very congested we would be potentially forcing motorists to drive at the speed of cyclists when there isn’t the recommended space to overtake.â€

Local cycling campaign group Camcycle expressed its dismay at the police’s decision, pointing out that the city’s narrow streets made the need to crack down on close passes even more important.

“Camcycle is beyond disappointed in Cambridgeshire Police,†a statement read. “We are angry that they are apparently advising drivers that it is OK to pass closely because maintaining the speed and flow of motor traffic is more important than the safety of vulnerable road users.

“The fact that Cambridge’s roads are narrow is precisely the reason why close-passes are a problem here and action should be taken against them. Cambs police contradict Highway Code rule 163 ‘Give vulnerable road users at least as much space as you would a car’. The accompanying image is clear: you should wait until the opposite carriageway is clear to overtake if there isn’t space.â€

With the police unwilling to take action, the group advises cyclists follow Bikeability guidelines and ride in the middle of the lane on roads which are too narrow for motorists to safely overtake, removing any possibility for drivers to attempt to dangerously squeeze past.

 

This scheme came about because of this:
 

A close pass initiative to protect cyclists could be rolled out by 16 police forces across the UK, covering a population of more than 20 million people, after police from Somerset to Edinburgh attended a training session on Friday.

The 16 police forces that attended a training and Q&A session near Edgbaston on Friday, covering at least 18 policing areas, were Avon and Somerset, Derbyshire, Gloucestershire, Greater Manchester, Hampshire, Humberside, Leicestershire, Merseyside, Norfolk, Surrey, South Yorkshire, Sussex, Warwickshire, West Mercia, and West Yorkshire, and Police Scotland, covering a total population of almost 20 million people.

 

Nice to see Cambridgeshire are not bothered.

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Hi Colin.

Well done for continuing with this topic.

Your picture on Barton Road is particularly interesting to me.

I live just along from there and my front door basically opens on to the the street.

My young dog enthusiastically rushes onto the street through the door when we go for a walk, albeit on a lead. I sometimes back out through my door with a wheelie bin.

Several close calls with hurtling cyclists mean I now have to change my behaviour and use the green cross code just to walk out of my house and on to the pavement.

I dread to think what conversation might ensue if I were to be the 'cause' of an accident.

I know this problem repeats throughout the city, but Barton Road is a particular hotspot, primarily because many cut through passed Sainsbury's via Station Road, which is all fine, as long as they stick to the roads!

I should point out, I am a regular pedestrian, motorist, and cyclist.

I smugly make sure I abide by all laws, well, especially when cycling anyway.

When I encounter cyclists on the pavement on Barton Road I refuse to get out of the way, and occasionally this results in verbal abuse.

Keep up the good work.

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Okay, the topic is called "Should cyclists be allowed on footpaths?"

Obviously the answer is no, unless it is a shared use, or actual cycle path.

But... And whether you like it or not, there is a but, when motorists make it so awkward, or so dangerous that you have no choice but to take evading actions, what do you suggest?

I'm not making excuses for the ignorant arses on bikes that pay no attention to any traffic laws, they deserve to be stopped, fined and treated like scumbags, but, there are also a lot of fair, respectful, thoughtful and downright scared people on bicycles that are bullied off the roads in some places in Hereford.

The fault does not solely lie with the person on the bicycle.

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there are also a lot of fair, respectful, thoughtful and downright scared people on bicycles that are bullied off the roads in some places in Hereford.

The fault does not solely lie with the person on the bicycle.

 

Just to address the last part of your previous comment above.

 

You could argue that there are also a lot of fair, respectful, thoughtful and downright scared people in cars that feel bullied by much bigger vehicles, such as lorries, buses, vans and even larger cars. My wife is terrified of driving on busy roads and dual carriageways in her little car and will only drive on a motorway if absolutely essential. Her view, which I share is that the police and authorities need to tighten up on ALL ROAD USERS and make it a safer place for all. If you were seen be a copper riding on a footpath then would pull over and instruct you to get off your bike and walk, these days they just drive past, which in my view is encouraging even more! This was never really an issue growing up, yes granted there are more vehicles on the roads these days but equally there are also more cyclists, the answer is NOT riding cycles on footpaths, that is just down right selfish with absolutely no consideration for pedestrians or pets.

 

I think what I find annoying about cyclists is many claim to be victims and will wear head cams to catch out the odd motorists when in reality they are often not much better, it is all about me me me.

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Hi Tara.

I mentioned a while ago, and I'm not sure how many people remember, if someone could confirm for me.

I'm sure a few years back an elderly lady, who was visiting the city for the day, was struck by a cyclist in Commercial Street, and she subsequently succumbed to her injuries. Can't remember what happened to the cyclist, certainly nothing like the furore surrounding the recent case in London. At the time the police said they were going to crack down on cyclists in the pedestrianised parts of High Town.

I see little evidence of this, with the exception of a few posters, aimed at cyclists, pointing out that CCTV is in operation! Big deal.

 

Google is your friend

 

A cyclist who was warned about riding on a city street has been jailed after knocking down a woman who died later.

Darryl Gittoes, 21, hit Mary Evans, 73, in Hereford city centre last July and she died in hospital nine days later, the Crown Prosecution Service said. 

Gittoes, who pleaded guilty to causing bodily harm by wanton or furious driving, was jailed for 12 months. 

The defendant, of Homestead, Hereford, was riding a defective bike recovered from a scrap metal lorry, the CPS said. 

His bike was examined and found to have had no brakes, a deflated rear tyre, a cracked front tyre and no bell. 

Gittoes was jailed at Worcester Crown Court on Monday following his guilty plea on 18 May. 

'Tragic consequences'

The court heard he had been warned a number of times about riding his bike along Commercial Street, where a Traffic Regulation Order prohibits cycling between 10:30 and 16:30, including on the day before the collision. 

Emily Lenham, senior crown prosecutor from West Midlands CPS, said: "Darryl Gittoes was fully aware that his bike was not in a roadworthy condition and he knew of the prohibitions which were in force along Commercial Street, however, on 30 July 2014 he disregarded the previous warning he had received from the police and rode his bicycle along this street and in doing so, he collided with Mary Evans, knocking her to the ground. 

"Mrs Evans would later die due to the head injuries caused by the collision.

"This case clearly highlights the dangers of riding a cycle in a pedestrian area and the tragic consequences of Mr Gittoes' actions should serve as a reminder to cyclists to take heed of prohibitions in place within such areas, which are necessary to preserve the safety of pedestrians."

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Hi Colin.

Well done for continuing with this topic.

Your picture on Barton Road is particularly interesting to me.

I live just along from there and my front door basically opens on to the the street.

My young dog enthusiastically rushes onto the street through the door when we go for a walk, albeit on a lead. I sometimes back out through my door with a wheelie bin.

Several close calls with hurtling cyclists mean I now have to change my behaviour and use the green cross code just to walk out of my house and on to the pavement.

I dread to think what conversation might ensue if I were to be the 'cause' of an accident.

I know this problem repeats throughout the city, but Barton Road is a particular hotspot, primarily because many cut through passed Sainsbury's via Station Road, which is all fine, as long as they stick to the roads!

I should point out, I am a regular pedestrian, motorist, and cyclist.

I smugly make sure I abide by all laws, well, especially when cycling anyway.

When I encounter cyclists on the pavement on Barton Road I refuse to get out of the way, and occasionally this results in verbal abuse.

Keep up the good work.

 

This must be a real nightmare, imagine if you just walked out of your house without really looking but causing a cyclist to swerve off the footpath to avoid you into the path on an innocent motorist on the road. I wonder who the authorities would try to blame?

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Just to address the last part of your previous comment above.

 

You could argue that there are also a lot of fair, respectful, thoughtful and downright scared people in cars that feel bullied by much bigger vehicles, such as lorries, buses, vans and even larger cars. My wife is terrified of driving on busy roads and dual carriageways in her little car and will only drive on a motorway if absolutely essential. Her view, which I share is that the police and authorities need to tighten up on ALL ROAD USERS and make it a safer place for all. If you were seen be a copper riding on a footpath then would pull over and instruct you to get off your bike and walk, these days they just drive past, which in my view is encouraging even more! This was never really an issue growing up, yes granted there are more vehicles on the roads these days but equally there are also more cyclists, the answer is NOT riding cycles on footpaths, that is just down right selfish with absolutely no consideration for pedestrians or pets.

 

I think what I find annoying about cyclists is many claim to be victims and will wear head cams to catch out the odd motorists when in reality they are often not much better, it is all about me me me.

 

I totally agree. The law is there for a reason.

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This evenings criminal riding across the Victoria Bridge which is only just wide enough for pedestrians!

The two girls in the photograph had to move to one side because the cyclist made no attempt to get off and walk. I told him that he should not be riding his bike across the bridge and he just smiled at me, said nothing and carried on. 

Victoria Bridge.jpg

I don't see any other vehicles making him feel unsafe so whats his excuse?

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