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Dogs off the lead in Hereford


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#1 Auron111

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Posted 15 August 2017

Hi everyone 

 

New here, first post and its not a happy one sadly. 

 

Around the King George V Playing field / Bishops meadow area I am seeing a lot of dog owners letting there dogs run loose when there is a sign stating dogs must be on its lead, just before the Victoria Bridge,.

As far as I know it is not a designated area where dogs are allowed to run off the lead, also the typical response from the owner is "he isn't dangerous, he wont bite"

 

As someone who goes jogging in the area I pay special attention to any dog that is running wild, I am not a dog person due to bad experiences with them in the past that I am not willing to listen to any owner who claims there dog is friendly. 

If I am jogging and a dog comes out of nowhere bounding towards/ after me, I will kick it away. I have already done this more than once and as always the owner blames me he his inability to control his dog. 

 

Has anyone else has this kind of things happen to them in the area or other places in Hereford ? 

I have spoken to a police officer and been told I am fully within my right to defend myself in situations like this, also should the dog be injured or die due to defending myself it's the owners fault. 


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#2 adamski

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Posted 15 August 2017

Hi Auron, and welcome.
It is a sad post.
I'm writing from the perspective of a long term dog owner, hopefully a responsible one, but I would be interested to know the ins and outs on this one.
I fully understand how people can be intimidated by dogs, especially big ones, and I know that not everyone is a "dog person".
I've had dogs for years, live in the city centre, and regularly exercise them in the areas you're concerned about.
I currently have a very old, slow and smelly lab, plus a very boisterous large one year old German shepherd, who is a handful, but not nasty.
I feel a fine line has to be struck and we all have to try and cohabit and get along.
My dog needs training and socialising throughout his life to ensure he is a well behaved and balanced animal. This includes learning to behave off the lead.
I try very hard to avoid getting in the way of others, and am always sensitive to those that aren't fans of big dogs.
I will admit that the only issue he has now is with people jogging, so I get where you're coming from.
I keep my eyes peeled, if I see someone jogging in time I'll get him back on the lead. The times I've failed, he's just been a nuisance, and sees them as something to chase, which is in his breed. He's never been aggressive, just boisterously playful, and this is annoying, I know. I'm just trying to get him to understand it's wrong. He used to go after people on bikes for the same reason, but that's not an issue anymore.
If I thought for one minute he was a risk I wouldn't even do what I do.
Around children he's great, but I'm wary of very small kids, as I know he'd knock them flying whilst trying to have fun.
I guess I'm saying that I know dogs can be a nuisance, not everyone likes them, some can be dangerous, and there has to be rules, but I'm also saying that if we live in a built up city environment we have to accept everyone's lifestyle choices and all try to get on and adopt a common sense approach. Dogs need exercise, training and socialising, to avoid the type of problems you're experiencing, and this isn't necessarily best done all the time on a lead.
I'll be interested to see how this turns out.
Best regards.
Adamski.
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#3 Frank Smith

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Posted 15 August 2017

Welcome, Aurun.

 

Notice of consultation for PSPO dog control

 

Anti-Social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014

Notice is hereby given that Herefordshire Council (“the council”) proposes to make a Public Space Protection Order (“PSPO”) under section 59 of the Anti-Social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014 (“the Act”) for the control of dogs in its area.
On 20th October 2014 the power to make dog control orders was repealed by the Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014. Section 59 of the Act provides local authorities with powers to make Public Space Protection Orders. These orders intend to address activities carried out in the public spaces that have a detrimental effect on the quality of life of those in the locality.
The Council takes the health and well-being of the residents very seriously and seeks to promote a health, safe environment for all residents, protecting them from anti-social behaviour in the form of dog control issues.
1. The proposed PSPO will be entitled The Herefordshire Council (Dog Control) Public Spaces Protection Order and it is intended that it will come into force on or before 20th October 2017.
2. The PSPO will replace the four existing Dog Control Orders which were previously made by the council under the provisions of the Clean Neighbourhoods and Environment Act 2005 and which will cease to have effect as from 20th October 2017 in accordance with the provisions of section 75(3) of the 2014 Act (or such earlier date, if the said Orders are revoked by the Council), namely:
a) The Fouling of Land By Dogs (Herefordshire Council) Order 2010;
b) The Dogs On Leads (Herefordshire Council) Order 2010; and
c) The Dogs on Leads By Direction (Herefordshire Council) Order 2010; d) The Dogs Exclusion (Herefordshire Council) Order 2010;
3. The proposed PSPO will have substantially the same effect as the existing Dog Control Orders, these effects being;
a) The Fouling of Land by Dogs
It will be an offence for any person in charge of a dog, which defecates on land specified within the Order, to fail to remove the faeces forthwith, unless he can show a reasonable excuse for failing to do so or the owner/occupier of the land has consented to his failing to do so.
b) The Dogs on Leads
To make it an offence for any person in charge of a dog to fail to keep that dog on a lead at all times on any land which is:
NOTICE OF CONSULTATION
(i) Used as a memorial, burial ground, cemetery or garden of remembrance.
c) Dogs on Lead by Direction
To make it an offence for any person in charge of a dog to fail to put and keep that dog on a lead when directed to do so by an authorised officer or agent of the Council or by a police officer in respect of any land which is open to the air and to which public are entitled or permitted to have access.
Any such direction may only be given if restraint of the dog is necessary to prevent a nuisance or behaviour by the dog likely to cause annoyance or disturbance to any other person on any land to which the PSPO applies or the worrying of any animal or bird.
d) The Dogs Exclusion
It will be an offence for any person in charge of a dog to take the dog onto or permit the dog to enter or remain on land within a dog exclusion zone unless he can show a reasonable excuse for doing so or the owner/occupier of the land has consented to his doing so.
Fixed Penalty Notice (FPN)
The PSPO will create a greater level of consistency across the county. All offences can be dealt with by issuing a fixed penalty notice (FPN) of £100 payable within 21 days with a reduction to £50 if paid within 10 working days. The maximum fine on summary conviction is level 3 on the standard scale; currently £1000.
Consultation
By virtue of Section 72 of the Act, before introducing a PSPO the Council is obliged to carry out consultation with the chief officer of police, the local policing body, community representatives and owners/occupiers of land covered within the order. The consultation will be publicised through the Council’s website. The consultation will be open for six weeks and will end on 5th July 2017
At the closure of the formal consultation period, Herefordshire Council will review all comments and will make a decision on whether to make the order or alternative in part or in full.

 

 

See attachment

 

Attached File  Notice_of_Consultation_PSPO_dog_control.pdf   56.72KB   12 downloads


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#4 Auron111

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Posted 15 August 2017

Hi Auron, and welcome.
It is a sad post.
I'm writing from the perspective of a long term dog owner, hopefully a responsible one, but I would be interested to know the ins and outs on this one.
I fully understand how people can be intimidated by dogs, especially big ones, and I know that not everyone is a "dog person".
I've had dogs for years, live in the city centre, and regularly exercise them in the areas you're concerned about.
I currently have a very old, slow and smelly lab, plus a very boisterous large one year old German shepherd, who is a handful, but not nasty.
I feel a fine line has to be struck and we all have to try and cohabit and get along.
My dog needs training and socialising throughout his life to ensure he is a well behaved and balanced animal. This includes learning to behave off the lead.
I try very hard to avoid getting in the way of others, and am always sensitive to those that aren't fans of big dogs.
I will admit that the only issue he has now is with people jogging, so I get where you're coming from.
I keep my eyes peeled, if I see someone jogging in time I'll get him back on the lead. The times I've failed, he's just been a nuisance, and sees them as something to chase, which is in his breed. He's never been aggressive, just boisterously playful, and this is annoying, I know. I'm just trying to get him to understand it's wrong. He used to go after people on bikes for the same reason, but that's not an issue anymore.
If I thought for one minute he was a risk I wouldn't even do what I do.
Around children he's great, but I'm wary of very small kids, as I know he'd knock them flying whilst trying to have fun.
I guess I'm saying that I know dogs can be a nuisance, not everyone likes them, some can be dangerous, and there has to be rules, but I'm also saying that if we live in a built up city environment we have to accept everyone's lifestyle choices and all try to get on and adopt a common sense approach. Dogs need exercise, training and socialising, to avoid the type of problems you're experiencing, and this isn't necessarily best done all the time on a lead.
I'll be interested to see how this turns out.
Best regards.
Adamski.

 

Thanks Adamski for your view as a dog owner.

 

I actually live out in the countryside so I am used to most people having a dog or two, the only difference I see if how behaved they are. 

Where I live most dogs never leave their owners side, and even when let loose they never run too far away. When one does stray too far one call from the owner and back they go which is something I haven't seen much in the city.

Far too many times I have seen the owners just talking away to people, completely oblivious to what their dog is even doing only noticing when barking starts or if someone else points out the dog is gone.

 

The part that annoys me more than most if that when a dog misbehaves it seems to be my fault, enticing the dog to chase me because I am running. It's also these type of owners that feel they do not need to clean up after their dog, either trying to hide it or leading the dog to a place that is hard to see.

 

While I know good and responsible dog owners are out there, and I do give dogs that are on a lead a wide birth while jogging just to be safe. Sadly a lot of owners just do not care what their dog does, seeing every action as just curious behaviour or playing. When I used to live in Hereford I was nearly bitten by a rather nasty dog at a young age, hence why I have such a dislike of them.  

 

I feel there is a misconception around dogs, they are always portrayed as mans best friend, loyal to the end but in reality, it's not the case. The very fact there have been dog attacks in the past prove no dog is truly loyal or tame, any dog can turn out of the blue.

Thing is a dog is an animal that was bred to help us hunt and protect us. Instead, it's now treated like an accessory, dressed up in cloths and shoved into bags hence the more stupid dog breeds even my cat could beat up. I think this is something that some owners don't consider when buying a dog and end up with a breed they just can't handle.

I can't blame the dogs for what they do but I do blame the owners who don't see the other side of dogs and what they can do. I would say I see you as a proper dog owner, you know the breed of your dogs and what they can do, you keep an eye out while with them and by the sound of it you don't treat them like children.

 

I wouldn't mind it if they created and area where dogs can freely run without getting in the way of other people. dogs owner can sit down have a chat and due to the fence, I can go past with out having to worry. We fence in areas for kids to play, make areas for people to skate board why not a place for dogs ?  


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#5 adamski

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Posted 15 August 2017

That all seems fair enough. A fenced off area would be a sensible suggestion. There is such an area in the far South East corner of the King George V fields actually.
I've spent probably half of my life living in the country and the rest in the city.
Your criticisms are fair actually. Country dogs seem better behaved on the whole, and the owners more responsible and diligent.
I do try hard to control my dog and be responsible, but he does need to learn boundaries and also let off steam, but I probably can take on board some of the points you've raised and do a better job.
I'm still trying to decipher the post with regards to new regulations from October this year!
I hope you get a good response and find things improve for you.
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